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Safety First! 12 Must-Know Pool Safety Tips for Parents

Must-Know Pool Safety Tips for Parents
Written by Guest Author

Pool safety is non-negotiable. When you look at the frightening statistics on children drowning in pools, you soon realize how vital pool safety is. Pool safety starts initially from your pool plans to the most common pool design mistakes. Preventative factors play a huge role, too, though – let’s take a closer look at crucial must-know pool safety tips for parents!

Drowning Prevention Tips for Parents

Tip 1. It would help if you walked instead of running. Whenever you’re near a swimming pool, never run. It is possible to sustain severe injuries if you slip and fall on wet concrete.

Tip 2. Listen to the instructions and follow the rules of the pool. In public pools, there may be different rules regarding conduct and play, including what is allowed in the pool and how to dress. Observe the rules of the pool at all times.

Tip 3. The shallow end of the pool should not be dived into. Never dive into an above-ground pool, and only dive in designated areas. Injuries sustained while diving can affect you for the rest of your life.

Tip 4. Roughhousing is not allowed. Especially with young children, the rough play in the pool can lead to drowning accidents. Swimming pool rules prohibit jumping on one another or holding each other underwater.

Tip 5. Drains and covers shouldn’t be played with. A pool drain or cover can pose a safety risk even when properly installed. Drains and suctions should never be played near. Children too small to escape are at risk of entrapment when they become stuck to drains or suctions. Maintain the gutters and covers of your pool regularly if you are a pool owner.

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Tip 6. Swimming alone should never be attempted. Even accomplished swimmers should always swim together and be supervised in a pool. Individuals alone or unsupervised are much more likely to suffer a drowning accident.

Tip 7. It’s essential to protect yourself from the sun. When swimming outdoors, always wear sunscreen and wear appropriate clothing. Children should especially pay attention to this.

Tip 8. When storms threaten, stay inside and out of the pool. Even with blue skies and no rain, lightning can strike suddenly. After the last lightning or thunder has been sighted or heard, take cover and stay out of the water for at least 30 minutes.

Tip 9. Prepare yourself for emergencies. Parents and caregivers should know CPR and first aid. Make sure you have a phone with you at all times. Children should immediately notify an adult when someone has difficulty in the water.

How to Keep Your Pool Safe

Here are some tips regarding the pool itself. 

Tip 10. Safety equipment should be used properly. Using pool safety equipment as a toy is not a good idea. Provide proper maintenance and access to all equipment whenever necessary.

Tip 11. Install a self-locking fence around your backyard pool. To prevent accidental drownings in backyard pools, the CDC recommends barriers to access. The fences must be at least four feet tall to enclose the pool area completely. Other safety measures you can consider include doors that alarm when opened and pool alarms.

Tip 12. If you do not intend to use the pool, keep it covered. Cover your pool whenever you are not using it (preferably with a motorized cover), even during the swimming season.

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Remove ladders and steps from an above-ground pool when not in use. Cover the entire pool’s surface securely with the cover. It may trap a child if it gets under it.

Pool vigilance from the beginning stages of the pool plans to the rules and the pool environment are all vital. They could save your children’s life. Please beware of the common mistakes to avoid when building a pool and the essential rules we discussed today. Stay safe, and enjoy the water! 

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